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Ruchik Randhap
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Don't ask me why it took me all these years to post this recipe. Despite being an ardent lover of traditional Mangalorean cuisine and being passionate about blogging those recipes I never really tried making it in recent times. The last time I made GoLi Baje was on a whim, much before the blog was born - so you can imagine. Six whole years passed by before I realised that this recipe was missing from my blog. Tsk! Tsk! In my defence, I don't like to deep fry a lot at home but I know this sounds like such a lame excuse. The GoLi Baje, the quintessential Mangalorean fritter *had* to be on the blog by now. Anyway better late than never. I am glad that I started the Kapi-Falhaar series which really gave me a kick on my backside to pay attention to some traditional fare that needs to come out of my recipe books and onto the blog. 

'Kapi-Falhaar' by the way is a collective term given to sweets and savouries that are eaten for breakfast or as a mid morning or teatime snack in Mangalore. They are generally short eats that are prepared at home or are available in small wayside eateries (hotels) or bakeries (if their shelf life is long). Most Mangaloreans I know can relate to the fact that most of these eatables were homemade, prepared by their mothers or grandmothers but over the decades and especially after small bakeries mushroomed across the towns, they were mostly bought instead of being made at home. Since my mum didn't do a lot of deep frying at home we used to have the GoLi Baje very rarely at home and mostly in hotels.
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BOSHI#24


A couple of weeks ago we brought a nice big raw jackfruit which the husband generously cleaned and shredded. Now since we are just two of us who actually like traditional Mangalorean fare we had to pretty much finish it all. After the Kadgi Sukhi (Raw Jackfruit Sukka) that I made sometime ago I decided to make some curry out of it. We decided to have a complete veg meal but then the prawn pickle somehow sneaked in as our stock of veg pickles got over. This made for a lovely weekday meal! Imagine eating this and then taking a nice afternoon nap! Sigh! If wishes were horses...

I hope you give this boshi a try and let me know how you liked it! If you have tried any of my recipes please drop me an email at ruchikrandhap@gmail.com. I'd love to hear from you!

Do check the complete Boshi series here

RECIPES: 

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Today's recipe is a simple North Indian style dal that I make so very often at home that I wonder why I never posted the recipe till date. Before you confuse this recipe (based on its name) to be a David Dhawan production let me tell you that this is purely my creation. I have experimented with it over the years and decided that the best way to remember how much of what goes in the dal it had to be named as #1 - because almost all ingredients are used in the quantity of 1 teaspoon or 1 tablespoon or 1 cup. Easy to remember?

I am very bad at remembering recipes - this is one reason why I am a very slow cook. I can't remember half the ingredients no matter how often I make the dish and reaching out for the recipe book or the ipad leads to so much loss of time! Having said that I also like to cook at leisure. My best dishes are those that I make without hurrying up and the ingredients of which I don't measure. However for the sake of the blog measuring has become second nature. Since my son loved the Rajasthani style panchmel dal that I had made a few years ago I stuck to the basics of that recipe to create something the measurements of which I could easily remember. I have since then made this several times changing things here and there. 
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Coconut & mango are two of my favourite flavours which remind so much of my time spent in Mangalore. Since coconut is a staple all year round, the majestic mango made its appearance only during the summer. We ate plenty and never got tired, such is the charm of this wonderful fruit. Since my mum cooked a lot of dishes using coconut milk I love it and still continue to use it in my kitchen today. However, since I don't make too many curries with it I decided to use this very versatile ingredient in a summery, melt-in-the mouth dessert that is just perfect for this weather. 

This recipe was in the pile of recipe cuttings given to me by my brother. He used to collect the recipes like I do now and at some point realised that if this pile was just a pile, lying unutilized then it was fit to be called junk. He decided to ask me one last time before discarding it and needless to say, I welcomed this pile with open arms (bollywood style). They say one man's junk is another man's treasure. True in my case. 
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Folks! The sweltering heat in Dubai has pushed me to try out some refreshing beverages and icy coolants like the kulfi I posted last week. A couple of months ago when I was drawing up a list of goodies to try this summer, my thoughts drifted to the Mangalorean 'ice candies' that I have grown up eating and those that are so much a part of everyone's childhood. Ever since I made the Ellu-Bella (sesame seed juice) a couple of years ago I have been toying with the idea of recreating the taste of my childhood. There are so many wonderful memories associated with this humble, extremely delicious popsicle that making it was a must! 

If you have grown up in Mangalore before the '90s then there is no way you could have missed the 'ice candies' that were sold outside schools. Since there used to be 3 schools in the same area as the school I went to, there used to be a ton of ice candy sellers selling their ware in insulated, aluminium and wood encased boxes firmly tied behind the seat. As soon as the final bell rang, we would rush out of the gate towards these ice candy sellers from whom we purchased (for a pittance actually) frozen delights in the form of popsicles on a stick (ice candies/ice lollies) or in thin, long plastic pouches famously known as 'pepsi'. The ice candies came in several flavours - the cheaper ones were simply coloured water in various flavours such as orange, lime, pineapple, mango, raspberry or cola and the slightly expensive ones were the doodh (milk) candy and the bella (jaggery) candy. I don't remember buying a lot of the doodh candy as it used to be expensive (perhaps double the price of the regular ice candies). The bella candy was by far everyone's favourite! There was something just so delicious and satisfying about the flavours - sweetness from the jaggery paired with an element of spice from crushed peppercorns and subtly flavoured with some cardamom. Most bella candies that I ate also had bits of grated coconut in it - isn't it such a lovely package? !
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BOSHI#23


Sometimes you randomly pair some dishes for your everyday meal and they match so well isn't it? The flavours of the moong curry and the choriz bafat went along like a house on fire! So delicious I can't tell you! This is a perfect meal plan for a weekend when you want a complete meal but don't want to kill yourself making too many things. The moong curry doubles up as a vegetarian dish and a curry for the rice at the same time and the chorizo is just a charm on your plate. So deliciously perfect!

I hope you give this boshi a try and let me know how you liked it! If you have tried any of my recipes please drop me an email at ruchikrandhap@gmail.com. I'd love to hear from you!

Do check the complete Boshi series here

RECIPES: 

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Folks, I am back with another delicious bread this month! 
This month's host is Jenni of Pastry Chef Online who chose 'stuffed breads' as the theme and I was absolutely thrilled. Imagine all the delicious stuffed breads that I was going to discover! Everyone was just as excited as I was on our baking group. For the past two themes I had chosen to make savoury breads and so I decided to make another savoury bread for this month too! When I was flipping through the Bread Bible, I came across a mouthwatering bread from Japan called the Kare-Pan or the Curry Pan (where 'pan' stands for bread in Japanese and Kare or Curry is just that - a thick curry filling). The bread in question was oval shaped (pretty much like the Totapuri mango), was rolled in Panko breadcrumbs before being deep fried (or baked). I was actually salivating at the thought of eating fresh Kare Pan but to my bad luck when I finally found a recipe I realised that I may have to run from pillar to post to find the ingredients, although I am pretty sure that some well stocked supermarket would have them. However, since I like making stuff that calls for easily available ingredients I didn't want to go ahead with this bread and make my readers in India face the problem of sourcing expensive ingredients that perhaps would not have a repeat use. I kissed the dream of eating Kare-Pan goodbye and proceeded to flip through the book some more. Thankfully, the Japanese have been generous with their variety of confections and it so turned out that the Cream Pan is a pretty popular and much loved snack. There was no way I was going to miss making these!
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The steady rise in mercury here in the UAE calls for plenty of refreshing and delicious summer coolants. I've always wanted to make ice creams at home but somehow that never really worked out. A couple of years ago I found the recipe in the Friday magazine and quickly tried it out. It was almost perfect and everybody loved it but I wanted to try it again and tweak the recipe a bit before I could share it here on the blog. Somehow over a period of time I just forgot about the recipe. Just last month I rediscovered it while hunting for another recipe and I wanted to try it right away. I got around to making it just yesterday and we have spent two blissful summer afternoons enjoying this deliciously creamy kulfi!
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BOSHI#22


I have been a bit under the week since the past one week and so the meals were kept simple. The hubby brought some raw jackfruit which he cleaned and shredded to be enjoyed in various ways. Since we both like this seasonal goodie in all its forms I decided to make the dry sukka first as you see in the picture. We call it the kadgi (raw jackfruit) sukhi and the rest of the items on the plate are also my favourite - simple comfort food at its best!

I hope you give this boshi a try and let me know how you liked it! If you have tried any of my recipes please drop me an email at ruchikrandhap@gmail.com. I'd love to hear from you!

Do check the complete Boshi series here

RECIPES: 
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BOSHI#21


One of my most favourite ways to eat clams (kube) is the kube mutli - clams and rice dumplings in a spicy coconut based gravy. The taste is simply out of the world! I hadn't made this in ages and I thoroughly enjoyed some when I made them recently :) I have paired it with breadfruit that I usually prefer shallow frying and ivy gourd made fugad (sukka) style.

I hope you give this boshi a try and let me know how you liked it! If you have tried any of my recipes please drop me an email at ruchikrandhap@gmail.com. I'd love to hear from you!

Do check the complete Boshi series here

RECIPES: 
CONTINUE READING »